The wit, wisdom, soul and perseverance of SHERMAN HOLMES, of the legendary HOLMES BROS., shines on his new album THE RICHMOND SESSIONS.

Sherman Holmes’ solo debut The Richmond Sessions can’t help being a milestone: It’s the esteemed singer and bassist’s first recording since the passing of his brother and musical partners, Wendell Holmes and Popsy Dixon, both in 2015. But his solo debut, dedicated to the memories of Wendell and Popsy, is no somber affair. The blend of bluegrass, gritty rock & roll and joyful gospel will be familiar from Holmes Brothers days. And with some of his strongest vocals on record, the album shows Sherman is still an artist in his prime. Long time friend, Joan Osborne, duets with Holmes on the Dan Penn classic, “Dark End of the Street.” Other songs include The Band’s “Don’t Do It,” Creedence’s “Green River” and Ben Harper’s “Homeless Child.”

 

 


“Sherman Holmes’ voice contains a lifetime of soul.  We are so lucky we still have him with us!” –
Joan Osborne

“A one of a kind record that’s just going to blow your mind, killer stuff throughout!” – Midwest Record

“’The Richmond Sessions’ is Sherman’s Southern-style, stirring Irish wake for departed brother Wendell and bandmate Popsy. Think of them fondly as you clap your hands and stomp your feet.” AP

“The Richmond Sessions” leads to the same satisfaction the Brothers brought forth on every outing. Thanks for sharing, Sherman.” No Depression

“The project is flawlessly rendered, The spirit of the Holmes Brothers lives on!” – Elmore Magazine

 

 

“Sounds pretty good for a 77-year-old, doesn’t it?” Holmes laughs. “I was overjoyed to do this, because I didn’t know how I was going to restart my career. We chose a good collection of songs that we wanted to do—We got some gospel in there, and some bluegrass. It’s a good mix of the Americana music, as I like to call it.”

 

 

Produced by Jon Lohman, Virginia State Folklorist and Director of the Virginia Folklife Program at the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities, The Richmond Sessions draws from Holmes’ longstanding Virginia roots. Lohman made the new album a Virginia-style family affair, bringing in guests like the Ingramettes—Richmond’s “first family of gospel” of 50 years standing—and instrumentalists like dobro master Rob Ickes, twice nominated for Grammy Awards; and Sammy Shelor, multi-time IBMA banjoist of the year.

Look for Sherman to hit the road for his first tour as a solo artist. “I’m really looking forward to getting out there,” he says. “That’s my life, man.”

Horizon Records has The Richmond Sessions in-stock NOW on CD!

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