GARLAND JEFFREYS’ magnificent new album “14 Steps To Harlem” is upon us, and we can’t get enough of that raw, masterful urban rock, reggae n’ blues wisdom.

Gene say, “Garland has been bringing crucial urban social-drenched rock-funk-reggae monster-ness since his unbelievable “Ghost Writer” in 1977.

His path and his songs have inspired and rocked us and caused pause for needed thoughts for these 40 years. Any new utterance from Garland is a big deal to me. ‘Back then we were so innocent/But now we know the score,’ Rock on, and thanks Garland.”

GARLAND JEFFREYS has been making provocative, personally charged urban rock and roll since the late 1960s. He started out in Greenwich Village performing highly respected songs that reflected on life as a multi-racial man in America. ‘14 Steps To Harlem,’ the third album in six years by this ‘beloved rock-soul-reggae singer-songwriter’ (New York Times) has released on his own label Luna Park Records. Produced with James Maddock with core band members Mark Bosch, Charly Roth, Brian Stanley and Tom Curiano, guest spots by Brian Mitchell and Ben Stivers, a gorgeous duet with daughter Savannah and a radiant violin solo by Laurie Anderson, this record delivers what fans have come to expect from Jeffreys: edgy immediacy and literate, emotionally raw lyrics coupled with a still supple voice capable of singing in a practically limitless number of styles.

Jeffreys has long held the respect of his peers and the breadth of contributors to his recordings and performances reflect that respect, as well as an ahead of the curve penchant for musical genre-bending: Dr. John, The E Street Band, John Cale, Michael Brecker, Larry Campbell, The Rumour, James Taylor, Phoebe Snow, Sly & Robbie, Sonny Rollins, Linton Kwesi Johnson, Bruce Springsteen, U2 and Lou Reed among many more have recorded and performed with him. It’s a testament to both the broad appeal and diversity of his music that his songs have been covered by hardcore punk legends The Circle Jerks (whose version of “Wild in the Streets” is a skater anthem), psych-folkies Vetiver and jazz trumpeter Randy Brecker.

The album features a myriad of musical influences and tracks include ‘Spanish Heart,’ a love song and celebration of Garland’s Puerto Rican heritage, a passionate blending of harmonies on ‘Time Goes Away,’ the riotous ‘Schoolyard Blues,’ a foray into 80’s synth pop with ‘When You Call My Name’ and the title track & single ‘14 Steps To Harlem.’

14 Steps To Harlem is in-stock now on CD and vinyl LP!

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