JOAN SHELLEY’s new self-titled album is eleven songs of sorely needed soothing wisdom in a chaotic world.

“JOAN SHELLEY’s 3rd release for No Quarter records arrives just after her stunning sets at the Big Ears Festival in Knoxville. And just in time to become one of our Summer of 2017 favorites. The vibe, song craftasmanship and performances of these eleven tracks only serve to stoke the fires of our already-ardent enthusiasm for this artist. Love that regular collaborator Nathan Salsburg return on guitar with his duo pal James Elkington on piano and resonator guitar, and it’s all simmered with two Tweedys: Jeff on bass and electric accents and Spencer on drums. In a crowded field of folksingers and writers, Shelley stands out tall as a true bringer.” – Gene Berger

In December 2016, after more than a year of touring, songwriter Joan Shelley, together with guitarist Nathan Salsburg, headed to Chicago, where they joined Jeff Tweedy for five days in Wilco’s studio. Spencer Tweedy, home from college, joined on drums, while James Elkington shifted between piano and resonator guitar. Jeff added electric accents and some bass, but mostly, he helped the band stay out of its own way. “He was protecting the songs. He was stopping us before we went too far,” Shelley says. Indeed, half of these songs on the album that resulted are first takes. “The first time is always the best. That’s when everyone’s on the edge of their seats, listening to not mess it up,” Shelley says. It’s fitting that the new release, slated for May 5, is called simply Joan Shelley. These are, after all, her most assured and complete thoughts to date, with lyrics as subtle and sensitive as her peerless voice, and a band that offers support through restraint and nuance.

While the songs of the Kentucky songwriter have echoes of both the American and British folk revivals, they’re also startlingly original. Shelley’s warm mellifluous voice evokes both the Deep South and the West Coast. Over the past five years, she’s released five albums. When not touring on her own, she’s been busy opening shows for Patty Griffin, Wilco and Richard Thompson. Her 2015 release, Over and Even, was called “one of the most beautiful releases of the year” by NPR Music and “as compelling a record as that genre has seen” (Pitchfork). Now the new album, with its eleven sterling songs, is the sound of Joan Shelley emerging as one of music’s most expressive emotional syndicates.

“This album is simply magical”  – 5/5 The Independent

“One of the finest, most concise and eloquent displays of songwriting you’ll hear all year”  – 9/10 Loud & Quiet

“Over And Even was next-level extraordinary; her self-titled follow up is even better” – ★★★★ Mojo

“Each of the Kentucky singer, songwriter and guitarist’s albums qualifies as a headache remedy, nerve tonic and comfort food rolled into one. Backed beautifully by guitarist Nathan Salsburg — whose own solo acoustic instrumentals are peacefully enveloping in their own right — Shelley’s music mixes the sound and feel of down-to-earth Appalachian folk music, airier U.K. folksingers like Sandy Denny, and soothing conversations with an understanding friend.”– NPR

Joan’s new album is in-stock now on CD and vinyl LP, along with her other solo releases and some catalog goodies by Nathan Salsburg & Jeff Tweedy!

  
  

  • NEW RELEASES, 9/15: FOO FIGHTERS, LARRY CAMPBELL & TERESA WILLIAMS, BRUCE COCKBURN, THE TEXAS GENTLEMEN & more!
    On “Concrete and Gold” Foo Fighters reflect the entire timeline of the classic-rock format; there are clear homages to the Beatles, Led Zeppelin, Pink Floyd, Queen, glam, thrash and grunge. But the band has a new producer, Greg Kurstin, who has collaborated with Adele, Pink and Beck. And with him, Foo Fighters now shuffle genres, even within songs, more suddenly and whimsically — more digitally — than ever. Previous albums have presented studio-enhanced versions of the band onstage, while on “Concrete and Gold,” Foo Fighters can switch configurations
  • NEW RELEASES, 9/8: GREGG ALLMAN says goodbye, THE NATIONAL returns, NEIL YOUNG gives us one from the vault, and MIKE STERN rocks our world!
    As rock superstars fade from the glare of fame into the shrouds of nostalgia, a few find ways to keep connecting. It’s not easy: Talent is critical but more important is honesty. This is especially true when the end of one’s path comes into view, when that road no longer stretches past the horizon but stops somewhere short of there. When Gregg Allman recorded Southern Blood, he could see what lay ahead. Knowing that this was his farewell statement, he crafted it meticulously all the way up to the end of his journey,