The PEACE CENTER’S 2016-17 schedule is packed-solid with great performers!

The Peace Center is Bringing. It. over the next few months, with some amazing acts that span the musical rainbow from Broadway to blues. Here are some of the highlights.

Sunday, Feb. 19th, ZZ TOP
After more than 45 years of rock, blues, and boogie on the road, they continue to entertain fans with hits such as “Sharp Dressed Man,” “Gimme All Your Lovin’,” and “La Grange.” Show is officially SOLD OUT!

Tuesday, Feb 21st-Sunday, Feb. 26th: BEAUTIFUL: THE CAROLE KING MUSICAL
Beautiful: The Carole King Musical tells the inspiring true story of King’s remarkable rise to stardom, from being part of a hit songwriting team with her husband Gerry Goffin, to her relationship with fellow writers and best friends Cynthia Weil and Barry Mann, to becoming one of the most successful solo acts in popular music history.

Monday, Feb. 27th: LANG LANG
Heralded as “the world’s ambassador of the keyboard” by The New Yorker, the star pianist Lang Lang has been selected as one of the 100 Most Influential People in the World by Time magazine, citing him as a symbol of the youth of China and it’s future. 

Thursday, March 9th: RICKIE LEE JONES & MADELEINE PEYROUX
Madeleine Peyroux & Rickie Lee Jones team up for a memorable musical evening! A masterful interpreter of classic songs and gifted with a seductively expressive voice, in the past two decades, Madeleine Peyroux has become one of popular music’s most imaginative and enthralling artists. Two-time Grammy winner Rickie Lee Jones exploded onto the pop scene and has made a career of fearlessly experimenting with her sound and persona. Jones’ live performances have reached a pinnacle of honesty and excellence.

Friday, March 10th: AMOS LEE
With a style that blends folk, soul and jazz, singer-songwriter-guitarist Amos Lee was hailed as an artist to watch in Rolling Stone. He honed his skills touring with such heavyweights as Bob Dylan and Norah Jones and has opened for Adele and the Dave Matthews Band, among others. His music has also appeared on numerous TV show and film soundtracks.

Thursday, March 23rd: ANN WILSON
As a songwriter and lyricist, Ann Wilson has created a truly impressive body of work, including: “Crazy on You,” “Barracuda,” and “Magic Man.” Ann has been performing with her sister Nancy Wilson as Heart, thrilling hundreds of thousands of concert fans annually. Now, it’s time for Ann to do something she’s always dreamed of and stretch out as a singer performing things not in the heart-shaped box.

Saturday, March 25th: EARTH, WIND & FIRE
Earth, Wind & Fire was born in Chicago in 1969 and is still going strong in its fifth decade. Spanning the genres of jazz, funk, soul, disco, R&B, and pop, the group’s hits include “September,” “Let’s Groove,” and “Boogie Wonderland.”

Friday, April 1st: SARAH JAROSZ
Sarah Jarosz has earned her credibility in the world where contemporary folk, Americana, and roots music intersect. Her reputation is built on three fronts—she is a gifted multi-instrumentalist (mandolin, octave mandolin, guitar, and banjo), an expressive and distinctive vocalist, and an accomplished songwriter. A multi-Grammy Award nominee, Jarosz is nominated once again for three 2017 Grammy Awards, including: Best American Roots Performance, Best Folk Album, and Best Engineered Album (Non-classical).

Sunday, April 23rd: GOV’T MULE
Legendary Southern rock torchbearer Gov’t Mule returns to the Peace Center this April. Showing off virtuosity and breadth for more than two decades, Gov’t Mule has had 15 studio and live albums, millions of album and track sales, and thousands of performances.

Tuesday, May 9th: STEVE WINWOOD
For more than five decades, Steve Winwood has remained a primary figure in rock ‘n’ roll, a respected innovator who has helped to create some of the genre’s most celebrated achievements.

  • NEW RELEASES 4/28: April is going out large as we get in new stuff from GORILLAZ, ROBERT CRAY, WILLIE NELSON, MARK LANEGAN, RON SEXSMITH, TROMBONE SHORTY & more!
    Robert Cray has been bridging the lines between blues, soul and R&B for the past four decades, with five Grammy wins and over 20 acclaimed albums. For his latest project, Robert Cray & Hi Rhythm, the Blues Hall of Famer traveled to Memphis with his friend, renowned Grammy Award winning producer Steve Jordan, to make a classic soul album with Hi Rhythm, the band that helped create that sound. Set inside an old theatre, the funky Royal Studios looks much as it did when Al Green was cutting those classics for Hi Records. Guitarist Teenie Hodges has passed away, but his brothers Rev. Charles Hodges (organ and piano) and Leroy "Flick" Hodges (bass), along with cousin Archie "Hubbie" Turner (keyboards), were still there.
  • NEW RELEASES, 4/14: YES, we do have the new KENDRICK LAMAR in-stock NOW, but that’s not all. We’ve got new STRING CHEESE INCIDENT, JOHN MAYER, and some jazz-classical love for Mr. Gene!
    Less obviously haunted by the influence of George Clinton than its predecessor, Damn still sounds rooted in early-70s soul. There are nods towards the luscious, harmony-laden mellowness of the Stylistics and the Chi-Lites (opener Blood even features a warped version of the kind of spoken-word monologue found on the latter’s single Have You Seen Her?), to the stentorian bellow that opens Curtis Mayfield’s If There’s a Hell Below We’re All Gonna Go and to the dense sound of psychedelic soul – by way of Outkast – on Pride. If it seems a more straightforward listen than To Pimp a Butterfly, there’s a cheering sense that this doesn’t equate to a lessening of musical ambition. There’s none of that album’s wilfully jarring quality – its sudden, anxious musical lurches and abrupt, short-circuiting leaps between genres – but the tracks on Damn still feel episodic and expansive: XXX alone goes from massed harmony vocals to a downbeat rap over glitching, stuttering samples, to a thrilling moment where it explodes in a mass of sirens, screeching tyres and heaving basslines, to a dramatic drop in tempo and an understated guest vocal from Bono in the space of four minutes. Rather than angsty disruptions, there’s a more subtle sense of disquiet here. The heavy-lidded drift of Yah would sound relaxed were it not for the presence of two grating bass notes that fit with the lyrics’ prickly unease, where images of contented family life rub up against “theories and suspicions”. Meanwhile, on the brilliant Pride, troubled lyrical shifts from modesty and confusion to self-belief – “I can’t fake humble because your ass is insecure” – are mirrored by a rap electronically treated so that its pitch gradually speeds up and slows down amid the woozy atmospherics and falsetto vocals. Elsewhere, there’s brilliant, dexterous storytelling on Duckworth – the saga of how Lamar’s father narrowly avoided being murdered by a criminal called Anthony, complete with an eye-popping, no-spoilers twist – and another demonstration of Lamar’s nonpareil ability to write songs about the pressures of wealth and success that somehow manage to elicit the listener’s sympathy rather than a roll of the eyes.