Trumpeter TERELL STAFFORD is ferocious, gentle, swingin’ and deep in the pocket on his new album, “FORGIVE & FORGET,” out now!

Veteran trumpeter Terell Stafford delivers the second installment of saxophonist Herb Harris‘s dynamic “Jazz Masters Unlimited” series production, with the unveiling of Forgive and Forget, providing a forum for Stafford’s talents and improvisational skills. Showcasing a repertoire penned and arranged by Harris, the trumpeter surrounds himself with a formidable quintet that makes his performance here much easier to appreciate. The A-list of players appearing with Stafford include tenor saxophonist extraordinaire Tim Warfield who served as the first masters series feature and a musical collaborator of the trumpeter for over thirty-years.

Pianist Kevin Hays introduces the opening statement “No, No, No, (That Ain’t The Way It Go),” with light key work on essentially a waltz-styled arrangement featuring stylish powerful solo moments from the leader, Warfield’s strong tenor voice and stellar support from the rhythm players, bassist Greg Williamson, drummer Rodney Green and of course Hayes on the keys. A piece with such an impressive tone and color, it’s repeated here on a second version or a “Take 2” that’s just as invigorating but a tad shorter.

One of the highlights and keeper of this recording, has to be the bluesy-tinged “A Two-Per to Fill” where Warfield fires the opening salvo and Stafford returns the favor with a dicey trumpet solo that energizes the tune for one memorable number. The lengthy title track captures Stafford on the muted horn delivering respectful moments on a solemn delicate ballad highlighting pianist Hays and the drummer with soft brush work on a graceful piece of music.

In stark contrast to the warm title piece, “The Owl Express” releases the hard bop juices that have been percolating underneath and features the entire group in a fast-pace tempo making this tune quite irresistible. Other notable tracks include melodic “The Tint Train” where Stafford’s high-pitch trumpet play is at its best, the soft and gentle ballad “Please Rest My Soul” and the swinging finale “Some Many Second Chances.”

With over twenty-years of experience performing on the world stage of jazz, there’s little doubt that Terell Stafford is a master and Forgive and Forget is an excellent vehicle confirming that status. A trumpeter who wields the instrument with versatility and power, this one master who puts it altogether here in a master performance anyone can appreciate.

  • Classical piano master and musical alchemist LANG LANG makes his PEACE CENTER debut on February 27th! YES!
    CALL 864-467-3000 OR VISIT www.peacecenter.org FOR DETAILS & INFO! If one word applies to Lang Lang, to the musician, to the man, to his worldview, to those who come into contact with him, it is “inspiration”. It resounds like a musical motif through his life and career. He inspires millions with his open-hearted, emotive playing, whether it be in intimate recitals or on the grandest of stages – such as the 2014 World Cup concert in Rio, with Placido Domingo, to celebrate the final game; the 56th and 57th GRAMMY Award two years in a row, where he performed with Metallica and Pharrell Williams; the Opening Ceremony of the 2008 Beijing Olympics, where more than four billion people around the world viewed his performance; the Last Night of the Proms at London’s Royal Albert Hall, or the Liszt 200th birthday concert with the Philadelphia Orchestra and Charles Dutoit which was broadcast live in more than 300 movie theaters around the United States and 200 cinemas across Europe (the first classical music cinema cast to be headlined by a solo artist).
  • ODDISEE takes us on another epic hip-hop journey with “The Iceberg,” out 3/10. It’s a social, personal and political work that seeks some answers within the chaos.
    The prolific MC, producer and musician Oddisee's new album, ''The Iceberg,'' is a plea for humanity to dig deeper in search of understanding and common ground. ''The Iceberg'' is a distillation of stereotypical tropes in hip-hop and beyond, 12 tracks about money, sex, politics, race and religion that appear superficial until his multi-dimensional lyrics unfurl to expose the complexities of individuality and identity: How we see ourselves and how others see us. Deeply soulful, and shot through with jazz, go-go, gospel, thick r&b and hard beats, the album is a timely, poetic statement.